Vinaora Visitors Counter

1312618
Vandaag
Gisteren
Deze week
Vorige week
Deze maand
Vorige maand
Alles
339
670
3630
850980
19650
19020
1312618

Your IP: 100.25.42.211
2022-09-30 11:37

Why do we have to grow old gracefully?

Jan Hystek rode a motorbike for the first time in Holland just after the war finished in 1946.He was 17 at the time and isn't surprised he is still riding 67 year later. In the past few years alone he has toured Australia, spent 25 days riding around Vietnam with his son, ridden around New Zealand's South lsland and toured the Philippines by motorbike.


So far Jan has managed to fit a lot into his 84 years and he hasn't finished seeing what the world has to offer just yet.
"I've always kept busy and I'm fortunate I'm healthy," he said. "I walk every morning and ride my pushbike nearly every aftemoon. 1make the most of every day.'


Jan moved from the home on acres he shared with his wife of 33 years, Heather, at the top of the Moonbi Ranges, into the township of Moonbi a few years ago.


Heather required intensive care for her dementia condition and a nursing home place became available for her so Jan also made a move off the farm. He took his three BMWs with him-a 1994 1100cc, 1981 800cc and a 2002 650cc. "I just like BMWs; they are a beautiful bike and reliable."

Jan's 1981 800cc R80G/S BMW is the same model ridden by Hubert Auriol when he won the motorcycle class of the1981 Paris to Dakar Rally. He doesn't use the 1100 as much these days and favours the lighter 650 for "everyday" use. "I have been lucky, I guess. The worst injury I have from bikes is my ankle got crushed by the 1100, but technically I wasn't riding it at the time. It fell on me," he chuckled.
Jan has a slight limp for his misjudgment of the big bike's weight but it hasn't slowed him down as he plans to travel Australia again before return into Asia for another visit. "I really like the Asian countries because of all the history that is there, but I can't take my bike as they are too big for their roadways,"he said. "We hire bikes while we are there."


Jan is not alone in his passion for seeing the world through a full-face helmet and not all people who enjoy motorbikes are what you would call hard-core bikers.
There is a social club of every ­ day ordinary people who enjoy motorcydes, but you have to be of a mature age to join. In1983 five people met at the Elizabeth Hotel in Sydney and drafted a constitution that would be adopted as the three basic principles or purpose for the Ulysses Club. These principals are to provide ways in which older motorcyclists can get together for companionship and mutual support, show by example that motorcycling can be an enjoyable and practical activity for riders of all ages and to raise awareness in both public and private institutions to the needs and views of older riders.


These stand,unaltered today, for the clubs 139 branches and two special-interest groups spread throughout Australia. It's a social club for people over 40 who enjoy doing things with other people who share a their interest in motorcycles.


"For me the (Ulysses) Club is good company, good mates and having people around that will help at anytime," Jan said.
The original suggestion was for over-SOs motorcyclists and the club says a letter published in the August 1983 issue of Bike Australia by one founding member, Stephen Dearnley, sparked comments including one questioning if he had ever been told about growing old gracefully.


As a result of this comment members have enjoyed growing old disgracefully, the club's motto, for the past 30 years.
The club took its name from the Greek hero in a poem by Alfred Lord Tennyson .


After many struggles and battles, a rniddle-aged Ulysses found himself securely in charge of his kingdom of lthaca. In the poem, he was getting bored with the things around him and longed to go adventuring again with his shipmates so they went off to find adventure. The club says this well describes the sort of person who still has enough spark to go on riding into middle and later years.


Members come from all walks of life and ride many different types of bike, but it doesn't matter who you are or what
enjoying good company and the open road. For Ullysses members, riding is about the journey, not merely the destination.


Most branches organise regular rides and social outings of various length and duration, as well as occasional weekends away.
These not only provide opportunities to get on your bike and go they are great social occasions and welcome breaks away from the daily grind.


Each year the club holds annual general meetings (AGMs) in different locations around Australia that attract between 3000 and 5000 members and guests. On the Friday and Saturday nights of the AGM, sit-down meals are served to more than 2000 people in a 70m-long marquee.


However, there is nothing to fear when that many iron horse riding, leather-clad Ulysses motorbike enthusiasts rumble into a town, as many locations around Australia have discovered over the years.


It's a week-long social event that boosts the local economy with the large number of well­ behaved, 40-plus years of age visitors who attend.
Members enjoy the journey to attend and the company while business is discussed as well as trade stands, motorcycle manufacturer displays and local tourist attractions, while the local community enjoys the These principals are to provide ways in which older motorcyclists can get together for companionship and mutual support, show by example that motorcycling can be an enjoyable and practical activity for riders of all ages and to raise awareness in both public and private institutions to the needs and views of older riders.


These stand,unaltered today, for the clubs 139 branches and two special-interest groups spread throughout Australia. you do, every person is on the same level when it comes to Ulysses.


Then there is the ride home afterwards. Jan attended the Albany, WA, AGM three years ago and decided to take a bit of a ride afterwards with some of his good mates from the club.


They rode together to Darwin where Jan decided to ride the rest of the way around Australia
"Western Australia is so big," a grinning Jan said.


With maturity also comes great responsibility and the club that welcomes the young­ at-heart works hard for its communities.
The Uliysses Club's preferred charity is UCARE, the Ulysses Club Arthritis Research Fund. It has given significant support to postgraduates via funding and providing funds to supply expensive laboratory equipment. In 2011, it offered a full fellowship to a research scientist at a cost of $80,000 for 12 months.


It also introduced the Motorcycle Apprentice of the Year Award in 2004 to encourage more apprentices into the trade. The award is still being offered to candidates from all states across Australia and donations so families in need don't miss out at Christmas.

For members, the toy run is a festive tradition just as much as putting up and decorating a tree in the house. The event is held all over Australia with all donations going directly to the Salvation Army.


lf you haven't heard it before, life begins at 40.You can also be considered for membership by the Uliysses club at that age. the National Committee approval, who are 40 years and over and hold a current motor­ cycle or trike licence. Spouses, or regular partners of members over 40 years of age, can also apply for membership.

Persons over 40, but who no longer hold a motorcycle licence because of age physical inflrmity or other acceptable cause, may also be admitted as a member of the club upon application.

 

The club is more commonly known for its Santa Run each December where it(,Ulysses Membership of the club is. open to any person, subject to the National Committee approval, who are 40 years and over and hold a current motor­ cycle or trike licence. Spouses, or regular partners of members over 40 years of age, can also apply for membership.


As for Jan Hystek, he has finally bought himself a bike other than a BMW Staying in a tent or sleeping under the stars doesn't provide the amount of comfort a caravan does, but you can't tow one of those with a motorbike. He can tow one with his ute however and the Honda fits nicely into the back and is far easier to load on and off than the big bikes.


"I'm going to try the grey nomad thing next but I have to take a bike with me so I can see the country properly," he said.
Local riders are welcome to attend the Tamworth Ulysses Club meetings on the first Tuesday of each month at the Calala Inn from '7pm.

 

Plaats reactie


Beveiligingscode
Vernieuwen